Best Power Pressure Cooker Reviews of 2017

If you need help deciding which is the best power pressure cooker you should buy, hop on to my Top List below. I also wrote Everything You Need To Know About Power Pressure Cookers that follows after the list. I encourage you to also take a look at the list of the best rated electric models on the market today according to my own reviews. In any case, have fun with your new cooker!

The Top List
ProductDescriptionMy ScorePrice
Power Pressure Cooker XL 10-Quart Review

Power Pressure Cooker XL 10-Quart Review

I think it's a decent electric pressure cooker for someone who wants something easy to use but it certainly isn't the best one on the market today.

Read Users' reviews
Power Pressure Cooker XL 8-Quart Review

Power Pressure Cooker XL 8-Quart Review

I think it's just an all right cooker. Certainly not the best in its class. With a few tweaks and a few higher quality parts, it could've been right up there with the rest of the best ones.

Read Users' reviews
Power Pressure Cooker XL 6-Quart Review

Power Pressure Cooker XL 6-Quart Review

All things considered, I don't think it's a bad pressure cooker. I just don't think it's the best electric pressure cooker on the market today.

Read Users' reviews
Everything You Need To Know About Power Pressure Cookers

Nowadays, it seems like there’s an almost endless number of pressure cookers on the market, especially electric ones. They range in size from 5-quarts all the way up to 12-quarts now and it seems like each one of them has their own unique set of features. Settings that include everything from sterilizing baby bottles to making yogurt.

Most of these models I know pretty well. They have familiar names such as Instant Pot, Cuisinart, T-Fal, Cosori, Bella, and Presto. Brands I’ve known for quite some time now. And then there are the models that I’m only beginning to learn about. The Aobosi, Elite Platinum, Geek Chef and Nutri Chef. However, there was one model which I’d been hearing a lot about recently and couldn’t help but try out. A model called the Power Pressure Cooker XL.

Judging from Power Pressure Cooker XL reviews, these devices seem to be extremely popular. It seems like people are just grabbing them up. Which makes me wonder if that’s because these are wonderful pressure cookers that deserve to be in every kitchen or they are just the recipient of a great marketing program. I figured I could only learn so much from  Power Pressure Cooker XL reviews, so I decided to break down and go ahead and review three of their popular models: the 10-quart, the 8-quart, and the 6-quart. Power Pressure Cooker XL reviews that you can see on this site.

After you finish reading those power pressure cooker reviews, you can come back to this article to learn how to get the best out of your electric pressure cookers. Not only the power ones but anyone that you buy on the market today. That’s because I’ve gathered up some great information and advice for you.

In this article, I’m going to show you how to familiarize yourself with your particular model of electric pressure cooker, whether it’s the best power pressure cooker or one of the more economical electric models. Then I’m going to give you some advice on how to use the Power Pressure Cooker XL and some general pressure cooker maintenance tips to wrap the whole article together in a nice bow. I’m pretty excited, so let’s get started.

Getting to Know Your Power Pressure Cooker

It doesn’t matter what brand of electric pressure cooker you own or how long you’ve been using a pressure cooker, you should always take the time to familiarize yourself with a particular model. Especially if it’s a model you’ve never used before. Here are the steps I use whenever I get a new pressure cooker:

Read the Manual

As soon as you take your pressure cooker out of the box you are going to want to read the instruction manual from beginning to end. Each particular pressure cooker has their own setting and their own safety procedures. Be sure to familiarize yourself with all of it before you attempt to use your cooker.

Assemble & Inspect

If your cooker requires some light assembly, then be sure to put it together according to the instructions in the manual. Once you have it all assembled, you should then inspect the unit. I know, I know; You’re going to ask why you should do an inspection before you’ve even used it. Well, the answer is simple. It’s for safety’s sake.

The odds that anything will be wrong with your cooker is probably a million to one. In other words, it’s very unlikely. However, that doesn’t mean that you should skip this step. Things happen and you want to make sure that you don’t damage your cooker, your kitchen or yourself, so take a few moments and look over the cooker for any defects or anything obstructing the valves or regulators.

Doing a Test Run

One thing that I like to do when I get any new power pressure cooker is to do a test run. I do this by plugging in the unit, adding a cup or two of water to the cooking pot and securing the lid. I then use the lowest setting possible on my particular electric cooker. For some models, that’s the Fish button. For others, you’ll have to set it manually. The point of the test is to “cook” the water for 5-minutes and see how long your unit takes to depressurize. Once it’s reached the 5-minute cook time, usually a timer will begin that will tell you how long to its depressurized. This is valuable information to know before you use the device for real cooking. Now you know how long it takes for your particular unit to naturally release pressure. Using this method is also a great way to check out the gasket seal and make sure that it is working correctly.

The Pressure Cooker XL has its own First-Use Instructions. The manual advises that before you use the cooker you wash the inner pot, the lid and the rubber gasket with warm, soapy water. After you’ve washed and rinsed these parts thoroughly, make sure that you completely dry them before heading to the next step. Once they are dry, fill the inner pot with water about two-thirds full, place the lid on it and rotate the Pressure Valve to the “lock” position. You should then run the unit on canning mode for 10-minutes. After this cycle has completed, take a pair of tongs and turn the Pressure Valve to the “open” position. Allow all of the steam to escape the unit. When it has depressurized and cooled down, remove the lid and pour out the water. Make sure that you rinse out the inner pot and then towel dry it. This pressure cooker is now ready to be used.

You’ll also want to take the time to familiarize yourself with your unit’s Quick Release Valve. This is the valve you turn to release all the steam at once. Once you’ve familiarized yourself with the manual, have done a test run and know how to Quick Release steam from your unit, it’s time to learn your unit’s particular buttons.

Learning to Operate the Power Pressure Cooker XL

While I created this tutorial with the Power Pressure Cooker XL in mind, it can probably be applied to a number of other pressure cookers as well, if you keep in mind that the buttons will often be in different positions. This guide is really just an overview of the buttons that can be found on an electric pressure cooker – whether it’s a standard model or the best power pressure cooker on the market today. Let’s begin.

The first two buttons you’ll notice on this pressure cooker are the buttons at the top: the Delay Timer and the Keep Warm/Cancel button. The Delay Timer is a feature which lets you set the pressure cooker to a time to start your cooking later on that day. The Keep Warm/Cancel button is the button you’ll use to cancel a particular function and/or turn off your cooker.

The next two buttons on the Power Pressure Cooker is the Canning/Preserving button and the next button is the Time Adjustment button. As you can guess, the Canning button is used for canning and cooks at a pressure of about 12 PSI. The Time Adjustment button is used to adjust the time. While this pressure cooker is marketed as being able to be used for canning, I would like to note that the National Center for Home Food Preservation (NCHFP) discourages people from using an electric pressure cooker to can their food. For canning, they recommend a stove top model.

The next two buttons are the Soup/Stew button and the Chicken/Meat button.  The Soup/Stew button is a standard 10-minute cook time that you can adjust using the Cook Time Adjustment button to adjust to 30 or 60-minute cook times. The Meat/Chicken button is a standard 15-minute cook time that can be adjusted up to 60-minutes.

Slow Cook and Fish/Vegetables Steam are the next two buttons to familiarize yourself with. The Slow Cook button allows the cooker to be set for a 2-hour standard cook time; A cook time which can be adjusted up to about 12-hours. The Fish/Vegetables Steam provides a quick 2-minute cook time that can be adjusted up to 10-minutes. This particular setting is the quickest cook time that this particular pressure cooker uses.

The next two buttons are the Beans/Lentils button and the Rice/Risotto button. The Beans/Lentil button is a standard 5-minute cook time that can be adjusted up to 30-minutes and the Rice/Risotto button is a 6-minute cook time that can be adjusted to 18-minutes or 25-minutes. The 6-minute cycle is good for white rice, the 18-minute cycle is good for brown rice and the 25-minute is good for wild rice.

The Pressure Release Valve is a simple valve to operate and has 2 symbols that line up with a triangle. The first symbol is a Bulls-Eye, which when lined up with the triangle indicates the unit is locked and ready to be pressurized. The second symbol is Rising Steam, which when lined up with the triangle indicates that steam is being released. Steam comes out of the top of this valve when it’s in the steam release mode, so be sure to protect yourself from this hot steam.

Many people wonder if this pressure cooker can be used to saute meat since there’s not a Saute button on this unit. Sauteing is easy. All you have to do is turn your unit on without its lid on. Put in some oil and the meat after the Inner Pot has gotten hot. Then saute your meat. When you’re done sauteing, you can then place the lid on the unit and it will begin to pressurize to whatever setting you set it on.

Now that we’ve familiarized ourselves with the functioning of this pressure cooker, I think it’s time to go over some safety guidelines. Of course, all safety guidelines mentioned in the manual should always be observed. The following safety guidelines aren’t a full list and your manual should always be the ultimate guide. Remember, even the best power pressure cooker can be dangerous to use if it isn’t used correctly.

Power Pressure Cooker Safety Guidelines

  • Read & follow all instructions before use
  • Always make sure the float valve is correctly positioned on the cooker
  • Check all safety features before use
  • Avoid touching hot surfaces
  • Never use an extension cord with this cooker
  • Only operate cooker on a stable surface
  • Don’t use this cooker for anything other than its intended purpose
  • Avoid overfilling this cooker
  • Don’t use this pressure cooker for pressurized oil frying
  • Don’t immerse base or housing to water
  • Protect your skin from escaping steam
  • Don’t pour cold water into a hot pressure cooker

Cleaning & Care of the Power Pressure Cooker

You should always follow the directions in your cooker’s manual but here are some general guidelines for cleaning your power pressure cooker.

After use, unplug your device and allow it to cool down. After that, the inner pot of the pressure cooker must be thoroughly washed after each use. Make sure that you clean it in warm, soapy water and only use a soft cloth or sponge and not a scouring pad or abrasive powder. Make sure that you avoid getting the base wet but wipe the out housing with a damp soft cloth or sponge. Make sure to clean the lid, in the same manner, removing the rubber gasket and washing it separately with a soft cloth. Make sure the inner pot, lid and rubber gasket is thoroughly rinsed and toweled dry.

When cleaning this device, make sure you remove the pressure valve according to directions and wash it under warm water. When it’s been cleaned, check to make sure the interior spring-loaded part moves freely. You can do this by pushing down on it. If it doesn’t work correctly, then don’t try to fix it yourself but contact customer service to find out how to have it repaired or replaced. Also, make sure that you clean all other safety devices on this unit before you use it again.

Some General Purpose Pressure Cooker Tips

I always try to include a section in my articles in which I give you some general tips for using your pressure cooker properly. Since I’ve done quite a few articles now, I’m beginning to run low on pressure cooker tips but fortunately for you, I still have a few available. Here are some general purpose tips that can be used with any electric pressure cooker. I hope you enjoy them.

Keep in Mind How You Cut Your Food

Remember, that you should always be mindful of how you cut the food that you place in your pressure cooker. Food should be evenly cut so that it cooks evenly and you want to make sure that you don’t cut your vegetables too small. If your veggies are cut too small, then they may overcook.

Start with the Shortest Cooking Time

Some recipes come with a short cooking time and a long one. If you’re not sure how long to cook your food, then use the shortest cooking time first. This will prevent you from overcooking your food. Of course, if your food isn’t quite done, you can always re-pressurize the cooker and cook a little longer.

Not All Pressure Cookers are the Same

Different pressure cookers cook at different speeds, according to how much pressure they build up. Some electric pressure cookers only cook at 11.6 PSI, while others cook at 12 or 15 PSI. Always make sure that you check your instruction manual to know the exact PSI that your electric cooker comes to so that you don’t overcook or under-cook your food.

Steaming Vegetables in Your Pressure Cooker

When steaming veggies in your pressure cooker by themselves, you should always use a steam basket and a trivet. You place the trivet in the bottom of your pressure cooker and the basket sits right on top of the trivet. As you probably know, the trivet raises the basket up a little bit so the veggies in the basket don’t touch the water. This allows them to be steamed.

Now, some people don’t know how much water to use while steaming vegetables by themselves and many instruction manuals don’t offer much information. While you should always follow the directions in your instruction manual first, if you’re particular model doesn’t offer instructions on steaming vegetables, then use the following as a guide: If you intend on cooking your veggies for 5-minutes, then use a half-cup of water. For 10 minutes, use one-cup of water and for up to 20 minutes of cooking time, then use 2 cups of water.

If you’re cooking frozen vegetables, then the general rule is that you should add an additional minute or two to the final cook time. As I stated earlier, however, this is a general rule of thumb and you should always follow the directions in your instruction manual.

Use Extra Care When Cooking Some Foods

Some foods have a tendency to froth, foam and/or sputter while they’re being cooked. Some of the foods which may do this include applesauce, spaghetti, noodles, split peas, oatmeal, cranberries, pearl barley, macaroni and rhubarb.

Soaking Beans Before Pressure Cooking

If possible, you should always try to soak beans before you pressure cooker. While you can obviously cook beans that haven’t been soaked in a pressure cooker, doing so will result in more time and more energy being used to cook them. So soak them whenever possible. Just make sure that you use the correct amount of water to soak them and Do Not Add Salt. Salt prevents the beans from soaking up all the water they need to soak up.

How much water and how long you should soak your beans depends on how many beans you start off with. If you soaking 1 cup of beans, then soak them in 4 cups of water for 6 hours. If you are soaking 4 cups of beans, then soak them in 16 cups of water for 8 hours. Soak times are flexible, however, and can be changed. Just be sure to never soak beans for longer than 12-hours. If you do, they will tend to fall apart while cooking.

Conclusion

Okay, this concludes my guide on how to get the most out of your power pressure cooker. I hope that this articles has been fun and informative and gave you useful information on the proper use and care of your electric pressure cooker. While there may be differences between particular models of power pressure cookers that I couldn’t possibly anticipate, I have tried to make this guide as thorough and thoughtful as possible. Be sure to read my Power Pressure XL Reviews for the 10-Quart, the 8-Quart and the 6-Quart models.
My Power Pressure Cooker Reviews

The Power Pressure Cooker XL is an electric pressure cooker that comes in three different sizes. It comes in a 10-quart size, an 8-quart size and a 6-quart size. This review is for the 10-quart size, so if you’re interested in a review for one of the smaller sizes, then be sure to check those out because today we’re going big or going home.

This pressure cooker is about 16″ high, 14.5″ wide and 13.5″ deep. The one that I received came with a booklet that featured some recipes in it, which I was pretty excited about and then I began to look through it. The recipes were definitely not for beginners and I’m not sure how useful they’d be for the average user.

The Power Pressure Cooker XL 10-Quart is a pretty spacious pressure cooker that seems easy to use. However, it doesn’t feel like the quality built product that I would have liked it to be. Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that it is a piece of junk, I’m just saying that I’ve seen better made ones. In fact, I’ve reviewed them and you can see them right here.

Like I said, using this cooker was pretty easy. It doesn’t have an On Button, so you just have to plug it in and its ready to go. Once you’ve done that, you can add your favorite food, lock the lid and use one of the push buttons to set the time. I wanted to see how it would cook a roast, so that’s what I tested it with. And that’s when I noticed that this unit doesn’t have a Saute Button. You can saute in it by placing the meat in the Inner Pot after it has reached temperature and cooking it with the lid off, but there’s no dedicated button.

After placing the lid on the unit and adjusting the time for the roast, I did notice that it took over 20-minutes for this thing to reach pressure. And when it reached pressure, it wasn’t a full 15 PSI. No, at its maximum it’s only about 11.6 PSI. I would’ve hoped that it reached a higher because it did take longer to cook my roast than comparable pressure cookers did in the past.

Overall, I think it’s a decent electric pressure cooker for someone who wants something easy to use but it certainly isn’t the best electric pressure cooker on the market today.

8.4 Total Score
Bottom Line

I think it's a decent electric pressure cooker for someone who wants something easy to use but it certainly isn't the best one on the market today.

Operating Temperatures
8
Cooking Quality
8
Value
8
Safety
9
Features
9
PROS
  • Large Capacity
  • Easy to Use
  • Many Different Settings
CONS
  • Lower Pressure Level
  • Inner Pot is Not Stainless Steel
  • Quality Isn't as High as it Should be
  • Takes a Long Time to Pressurize
User Rating: Be the first one!

The Power Pressure XL 8-Quart Pressure Cooker is an electric pressure cooker which is about 14″ high, 12″ wide and approximately 14.5 ” deep. It has a non-stick inner pot that isn’t made out of stainless steel but is made out of some sort of coated aluminum. Like other Power Pressure XL models, it has a safe lock lid that has a manual steam release and a decent size digital display that features a number of different buttons. These buttons include a button for Delay Timer, Keep Warm/Cancel, Canning/Preserving, Time Adjustment, Soup/Stew, Chicken/Meat, Slow Cook, Rice/Risotto, Beans/Lentils and Fish/Vegetables Steam.

The first thing I tested in this pressure cooker was its rice feature. I placed my brown rice in it, pressed the Rice Button and adjusted the time to 18-minutes using the Cook Time Selector button. It took a little while to come to pressure, but when it did the timer began to count down. After I released the steam using the easy-to-use steam release and a pair of tongs, I checked the rice and it was cooked pretty well. It would appear this unit does well with foods that require less of a cook time. So I decided to test it using a dish that was a little more time intensive and that dish was beef stew.

After I prepared my beef stew, which was cuts of sirloin, potatoes and various vegetables, I cooked it in the pressure cooker. One thing I immediately noticed about this pressure cooker was that it really didn’t reach a very high pressure, so it took a bit longer to cook my stew than it did in other electric pressure cookers. I wasn’t really happy with it’s lack of power.

Another thing I really didn’t care for about this pressure cooker was that it didn’t have that quality feel to it that I had expected. I didn’t like the fact that it didn’t have a stainless steel Inner Pot and I didn’t like how the lid felt. I’m not sure if this cooker would stand up to the test of time.

Overall, I think the Power Pressure XL 8-Quart Pressure Cooker is just an all right cooker. It’s certainly not the best pressure cooker in its class. If you’re looking for the best pressure cooker, we feature many of them on this site. Unfortunately, this isn’t one of them. Which is quite a shame. I think with a few tweaks and a few higher quality parts, this cooker could’ve been right up there with the rest of them. They just kind of missed the mark.

8.2 Total Score
Bottom Line

I think it's just an all right cooker. Certainly not the best in its class. With a few tweaks and a few higher quality parts, it could've been right up there with the rest of the best ones.

Operating Temperatures
8
Cooking Quality
8
Value
8
Safety
9
Features
8
PROS
  • Decent Capacity
  • Easy to Use
  • Many Different Settings
CONS
  • Lower Pressure Level
  • Inner Pot is Not Stainless Steel
  • Quality Isn't as High as it Should be
User Rating: Be the first one!

The Power Pressure Cooker XL 6-Quart is an electric pressure cooker that features a coated aluminum Inner Pot, a digital display, one-touch cook buttons, a lid with a large arm handle and easy to use steam release valve and a number of built-in safety features. It’s supposed to be capable of being used for everything from a pressure cooker and a soup maker to a canner, slow cooker, rice cooker and steamer. Let’s see how just how well it works, shall we?

As was the case with the other pressure cookers in this line (I reviewed the 10-quart and 8-quart models previously), the build quality wasn’t as good as I had hoped it to be. As was the case with the others, it lacked a stainless steel Inner Pot and it’s lid didn’t feel like it would hold up to long-term use. At least, that’s how it felt to me. I just think they could’ve used higher quality materials in the construction of this pressure cooker.

While this electric pressure cooker had a smaller capacity than the other units in this line, it also came with a much smaller price tag. Which I really appreciated seeing in this model. And while it didn’t have the pressure that other electric pressure cookers have, it did a decent job handling tasks such as cooking pork for my famous BBQ Pulled Pork. Since it was smaller, it didn’t take as long to pressurize as those other units and it did a decent job.

While this unit is advertised as being able to be used to can food but I wouldn’t recommend doing that. This unit delivered under 12 PSI of pressure at its highest setting and I just don’t think that it’s safe to use it for canning. Particularly when the NCHFP discourages people from using electric pressure cookers for canning.

All things considered, I don’t think the Power Pressure Cooker XL 6-Quart is a bad pressure cooker. I just don’t think it’s the best electric pressure cooker on the market today. If you’re looking for the best electric pressure cooker, then check this list where I listed the best on the market today. There are some really good models that are just waiting for you. Unfortunately, this pressure cooker just doesn’t make the grade.

8 Total Score
Bottom Line

All things considered, I don't think it's a bad pressure cooker. I just don't think it's the best electric pressure cooker on the market today.

Operating Temperatures
8
Cooking Quality
8
Value
8
Safety
9
Features
7
PROS
  • Easy to Use
  • Many Different Settings
CONS
  • Small Capacity
  • Lower Pressure Level
  • Inner Pot is Not Stainless Steel
  • Quality Isn't as High as it Should be
User Rating: Be the first one!