Best Stovetop Pressure Cooker Reviews of 2017

If you need help deciding which is the best stovetop pressure cooker you should buy, hop on to my Top List below where I listed my top picks for this year. I also wrote Everything You Needed To Know About Stove Top Pressure Cookers that follows after the list. In any case, have fun with your new cooker!

The Top List
ProductDescriptionMy ScorePrice
My Choice
All American 921 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner Review

All American 921 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner Review

It's a large, heavy-duty American-made cooker that's capable of canning and cooking just about anything you throw at it.

Read Users' reviews
Presto 01781 23-Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker Review

Presto 01781 23-Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker Review

A high quality cooker that should bring you many years of cooking and canning. It has become a welcome addition to my kitchen.

Read Users' reviews
Presto 01370 8-Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker Review

Presto 01370 8-Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker Review

I think it's really good. Durable, easy to use and has a few nice features - a good value and worth taking a look at.

Read Users' reviews
Kuhn Rikon Stainless-Steel Pressure Cooker, 7 qt Review

Kuhn Rikon Stainless-Steel Pressure Cooker, 7 qt Review

A high quality pressure cooker. While a little more expensive than comparable models its size it did a great job cooking.

Read Users' reviews
T-fal P45007 Clipso PTFE, PFOA & Cadmium Free 12-PSI, 6.3-Quart Review

T-fal P45007 Clipso PTFE, PFOA & Cadmium Free 12-PSI, 6.3-Quart Review

If you are looking for a pressure cooker and you don't mind that it operates at more than 12 PSI, then go ahead and get this cooker.

Read Users' reviews
NuWave Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker, 6.5-Quart Review

NuWave Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker, 6.5-Quart Review

All things considered, I think this is a pretty good little pressure cooker. You'd probably be hard pressed to find another cooker that cooked as well as this one did for the price.

Read Users' reviews
Everything You Needed To Know About Stove Top Pressure Cookers

At one time, pressure cookers were regarded as dangerous kitchen utensils that our grandmothers used to make dinner or to can her homegrown vegetables. They were considered old fashioned by some people and downright dangerous by others. However, over the past few years, pressure cookers have undergone somewhat of a renaissance period. More and more households are trying these devices out and as a result, more and more people are singing these devices praises. They are not only seen as safe and modern devices but are also are considered to be machines capable of producing incredible culinary results.

This popularity has produced a rise in the number of pressure cookers available. Which is both good and bad news for those consumers looking to buy the best stovetop pressure cooker. An uptick in units manufactured and competition means there are more options available among pressure cookers. However, it also means that the average person is going to have to comb through more stovetop pressure cooker reviews to find exactly what they’re looking for.

Of course, the number of stovetop pressure cooker reviews you’ll have to comb through is greatly diminished if you separate stove top models from electric models. Which a lot of people don’t do because they figure the best electric cooker is roughly equivalent to the best stainless steel pressure cooker—which it is not. Stove top and electric cookers differ in the way they operate and how they cook your food, so it’s best to know the pros and cons of these devices so you know which one will suite your particular cooking needs.

Which is why I decided to write this article. I wanted to let you know what to look for in the best stovetop pressure cooker and how they differ from electric models. I also wanted to give you some hints and tips about using these devices. So without further delay, let’s get right down to business.

The Advantages of Using A Stove Top Pressure Cooker

They have more power — Stove top models are generally faster and more powerful than electric models. While electric models can cook food twice as fast as conventional cooking methods, stovetop cookers can cook three times faster. That also means that these models can produce higher cooking pressures than electric models can as well.

They’re more durable — Let’s face facts, stovetop pressure cookers are a whole lot more durable than electric ones. Sure, electric cookers can last many, many years before they need to be replaced. Probably a lot longer than one would expect. Stovetop models, on the other hand, not only can last years but they can last for generations. In fact, my brother is still using the same stovetop model that my grandmother used and he loves it.

Can cool down faster — Stovetop models often have quick release valves that allow them to depressurize very quickly. And this results in a cooker that can cool down very quickly. While not every model of pressure cooker is comparable to each other, most stove top models will cool down faster than most electric ones.

They’re Great for Searing — A bid advantage of a stove top pressure cooker is that they can really sear food well. Without the lid on, you can use them like you would any other pan and sear those pieces of meat or veggies before you pressure cook them. That isn’t possible with electric models.

Come in a Variety of Sizes — There always seems to be a great variety of sizes with stove top models than there seem to be with electric models. Electric ones are usually between 5 and 8 quarts, but stove top ones can be as small as 2-person models all the way to huge family sized models.

The Disadvantages of a Stove Top Pressure Cooker

They require more attention — These cookers tend to need the user to be present while they’re running to make sure that the pressure stays within the limits the user want it to stay. With electric models, you can pretty much set them and forget them.

They’re less energy efficient — On average, electric models use less energy than the ones you use on the stove.

Less places they can be used — While electric models can be used anywhere there is an outlet, stove top models require a stove to work.

Getting the Most out of Your Stove Top Pressure Cooker

Since a stove top pressure cooker has unique qualities that distinguish it from electric models, there are ways that you can use it to get the most out of it. Here are a few things to consider when using a stove top pressure cooker.

Take Advantage of its Versatility

Stove top pressure cookers are great for turning that tough cut of pork shoulder or that cheap cut of beef into something mouth watering delicious. However, it can over cook delicate cuts of meat, fish or vegetables if you’re not careful. Fortunately, there’s a way around that.

If you dish requires vegetables as well as meat, then you can always pressure cook the meat and then release the pressure and saute the vegetables or fish in it afterwards. Which is actually one of the advantages of using a stove top model. Once it’s depressurized and the lid is removed, it can be used like any other pan. Which provides you with a great deal of versatility while cooking.

What if you have a beef stew that has beef, potatoes and vegetables? Well, you can always begin by cooking the meat about halfway, then by releasing the pressure and adding the potatoes. When the potatoes are about 70% through their recommended cooking time, you can then add the vegetables. Usually this will result in everything being done perfectly at the same time, although you may have to make adjustments to each recipe.

Adjust Your Heat

When using a stove top model, you should give some thought to how exactly you use it. These type of pressure cookers work best when you heat them on a burner over high until they come to the correct pressure and then lower the burner to maintain pressure in the cooker. Which is fairly easy to do when you’re using a gas burner. All you have to do is turn it down. However, electric burners can be trickier because their temperature doesn’t automatically decrease when you lower the temperature. You can overcome this though by using the two burner method for electric stoves.

The two burner method, as you might suspect, uses two burners. One burner is set all the way to high and that burner is used to bring the pressure cooker to temperature. Once it has reached the pressure you want, you then switch it to another burner that is preset at a lower temperature designed to maintain the cooker’s pressure. While this method may require a bit of practice, I’ve found that it does a good job of giving me control over my stove top pressure cooker on electric stoves.

Don’t Forget to Brown

Just because you’re using a pressure cooker that doesn’t mean that you can’t brown or sauté your food to give them that extra flavor. I like to brown the meats I use for a stew before I pressure cook them. I do this by browning them and then using wine, water, broth or even coffee to deglaze the bottom of the pot – giving them a good scrape with a spatula to remove those little bits of meat from the bottom. I then finish off the recipe, put on the lid and pressure cook the stew like I normally would. And it always turns out great.

Adjust For High Altitude Cooking

Most recipes designed for pressure cookers are designed for use at sea level. However, not all of us live at sea level so sometimes adjustments have to be made and these adjustments can confuse people. If you live at sea level or about 2000-feet above sea level, then you most likely won’t have to make any adjustments. If you live above 2000-feet above sea level, then you are going to have make some adjustments. As a general rule of thumb, you’re supposed to increase cooking time by 5% for every 1000-feet above this 2000-foot base. For instance, if you live at 3000-feet above sea level, then you should raise your cooking time by about 5%. However, please keep in mind that you should always follow the instructions provided in your pressure cooker’s instruction manual first and foremost.

Overfilling Should Always be Avoided

One of the main things you need to avoid while cooking with a stove top pressure cooker is to avoid overfilling it. Steam in your cooker needs rooms and if your overfill your cooker it can cause an increase in pressure. This pressure increase can have disastrous implications.

Overfilling your cooker can not only lead to a loss of flavor and texture due to the increased pressure but it can also cause a safety concern. Overfilling can cause the pressure vents in the lid to become clogged which in turn leads to an increase in pressure – an increase in pressure that can soon become very dangerous. You can avoid this situation by never filling your pressure cooker more than 1/2 full with liquid or more than 2/3rds full with food.

Use the Appropriate Pressure Release Method

I’ve covered it in other articles on this site but I think it bears repeating that there are 3 different pressure release methods you can use with a stove top pressure cooker. Each method is best used for a certain type of food, as you’ll soon see:

  1. Natural Release Method
    The natural release method is a method of pressure release where you remove the cooker from the heat and allow it to release pressure naturally. This method takes around 20 minutes and is best used for dishes that are mostly liquids, for meats or for dishes that tend to froth.
  1. Quick Release Method
    The quick release method is a good technique to use when you have to cook different ingredients at different times. For instance, such as when you are making a stew and need to cook the meat partway through before you add the veggies so you don’t overcook them. Using the valve on top of the cooker, you simply release all of the pressure all at once. This method allows you to get into the cooker quickly but shouldn’t be used with some foods. For example, don’t try to use this method with foods that are mainly liquid or may froth (they may clog the pressure valve) or with meat (it may toughen it up).
  1. Cold Water Release Method
    The cold water release method involves removing the cooker from the heat, opening up the quick release valve and holding the cooker at a slight angle under cold water in the sink. This allows water to flow over the edge of the lid and down the sides. While using this method, be sure not to let water run directly over the valve or the vent. You can use this method to prevent sensitive foods such as vegetables from overcooking

Taking Care of Your Pressure Cooker

You should always make sure that you clean your pressure cooker well and store it right when you are done. If you don’t, then you may risk damaging the cooker or at least limiting its lifespan. After all, even the best stainless steel pressure cooker is subject to corrosion if it’s not properly taken care of in the kitchen, so be sure to follow these basic steps.

Always make sure that you wash not only the pot but also the rubber gasket and the lid of the pressure cooker with warm, soapy water. Make sure after it’s washed, that you dry it well. Before you put it away, make sure that the safety valves are clean and are unobstructed. Also, check the rubber gasket and make sure that it’s still flexible. Make sure that you store your cooker in a dry place.

Conclusion

Well, this concludes my article on stove top pressure cookers. Hopefully, it provided you with the information you needed to decide if one of these pressure cookers was right for you or if you already own one, the information you need to get the most out of it.
My Stovetop Pressure Cooker Reviews

I’ve heard many good things about the All American 921 21-1/2-Quart Pressure Cooker/Canner, so needless to say I was pretty excited to get my hands on one. After all, these cookers have been manufactured by the Wisconsin Aluminum Foundry in the USA since the 1930s and some people claim that this series is the best pressure cooker. It is also one that seems to consistently get high ratings in their pressure cooker reviews. Let’s get started!

The first thing I noticed when I unpacked this cooker is that it’s nice, big and heavy. In fact, it feels like something that you’d find in some industrial kitchen. It’s made out of cast aluminum and weighs around 20 pounds. I should have expected that however, considering that it’s a 21-1/2-quart pressure cooker made out of metal. It just feels like its high quality.

The next thing that I noticed is that it doesn’t use gaskets of any kind. It has a metal to metal design that should make it last a really good time. That’s because gaskets are usually one of the first things that begin to wear out on a pressure cooker, so it’s pretty nice to see one made without a gasket. Which probably confirms the stories I’ve heard of people passing these cookers down through the generations as a family heirloom. I don’t have a few decades to test that premise but this cooker does feel like it could last a good long time. Probably the only thing that would wear out is the pressure gauge.

Using it was fairly easy as well. I just put water into it and tightened down the screws and I was ready t go. It not only came to pressure quickly but it also heated up very evenly. This allowed me to make several great meals and even try my hand at canning some vegetables. I must say that this is a nifty cooker, although it’s quite big and heavy.

I was able to set it to 5 PSI, 10 PSI or 15 PSI. 15 PSI is a really high pressure and heat that can really cook meals in no time flat. The lower PSI is good for soups and stews that you plan on slow cooking. Being able to adjust between these 3 settings gave me quite a range of cooking temps to choose from.

Although my experience with this cooker has been positive so far, I do have one concern. Whether it would be good on smooth top (glass top) stoves. Obviously, since it’s heavy, you don’t want to drop it on your glass top stove—even from a relatively low height. But I’m also concerned that these types of stoves might not heat it up correctly, especially electric stoves that cut off the burner when it gets too hot. If you’ve used stove top pressure cookers before and haven’t had a problem, then you might not with this one either but it is something to consider.

Overall, I think this cooker is a large, heavy-duty American-made cooker that’s capable of canning and cooking just about anything you throw at it.

9.8 Total Score
Bottom Line

It's a large, heavy-duty American-made cooker that's capable of canning and cooking just about anything you throw at it.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
10
Value
9
Safety
10
Features
10
PROS
  • Heavy Duty
  • Durable
  • American Made
  • All Metal-No Gasket To Deform
  • 3 Pressure Levels (5, 10 & 15 PSI)
CONS
  • May Not Be Good For Use On Some Smooth Stove Tops
User Rating: Be the first one!

Up for review today is the Kuhn Rikon Stainless-Steel Pressure Cooker, 7 qt. This is a pressure cooker that I didn’t know much about until I found it and decided to check out some fairly positive pressure cooker reviews. So I decided to test it out in my own kitchen and see if it has what it takes to be one of the best pressure cookers I’ve reviewed.

The first thing that grabbed my attention was its design. It seems to me that it looks like a cross between a pressure cooker and a sauce pan. It’s made out of 18/10 stainless steel. It has two handles on the side and also a handle attached to the lid. While this cooker has a general sturdy look to it, there are some plastic parts that give me some concern, but I didn’t have an issue with them while I was using it.

The next thing that I noticed was that it had a number of safety mechanisms built into it. It has 5 safety systems in total, which include a spring-loaded valve and an automatic locking system. This really gave me the confidence to really push this system and see what it can do.

The first thing I tried was making a roast. Since this cooker is tall but has a smaller diameter opening, I couldn’t use it to brown it but I did fit the roast into it and threw in some veggies. In about a half an hour, my roast was done and delicious. And all the while it cooked my roast, this cooker barely made any noise at all.

In fact, this cooker was really quiet during its entire operation. Sure, it made some noises as it was coming to temperature, but otherwise it was pretty quiet. Not like the old stove top rocking cookers at all, which made quiet a lot of noise as they rocked back and forth.

I also tried canning with the  Kuhn Rikon Stainless-Steel Pressure Cooker, 7 qt.  but like I said, it’s not very big. It only holds about 4 pint jars or 3 quart jars. Not enough to do any of the large canning I was planning to do but enough I suppose for the casual canning enthusiast.

Although cooking was a breeze, I did find cleanup was a little more involved than I would have liked. It wasn’t difficult to clean, it just required a little more effort. For example, I had to wash the pot and the gasket with a mild dish soap and then I had to lightly oil the gasket. The valve is self-cleaning on this model or supposed to be, but it may need to be taken apart if food passes through it.

All things considered, I felt like this was a high quality pressure cooker that was pretty quiet and did a great job cooking. While it’s a little more expensive than comparable models its size, and is small for canning, I did think it was a pretty decent cooker.

9.6 Total Score
Bottom Line

A high quality pressure cooker. While a little more expensive than comparable models its size it did a great job cooking.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
10
Value
9
Safety
10
Features
9
PROS
  • High quality
  • Quiet
  • 5 Safety Systems
CONS
  • Expensive For Its Size
  • Cleanup Can Be A Little Labor Extensive
User Rating: Be the first one!

Looking like a big stockpot with a pressure release valve and a pressure gauge sticking out of the top of it is the Presto 01781 23-Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker. Does it have what it takes to become one of the best pressure cookers I’ve reviewed? Well, let’s find out and take a good look at this cooker/canner that has generally received some pretty good praise from other pressure cooker reviews.

This device is not only made of high quality aluminum but it is also big enough to hold 23 quarts—which makes it very suitable for canning. And even though it’s big, because it’s made of aluminum it is lighter than some cookers, which should make it good for use on smooth stovetops or just about any other stove-top.

However, as they say, the proof is in the pudding, so I decided to put this thing to the test and see if it can pull out a win. The first thing I decided to do was to use it to can some vegetables. I didn’t have any from my garden, so I decided to go out to the grocery store and buy some bell peppers and try my hand at canning. After following all of the instructions in the guide, in about 40 minutes I had my red bell peppers canned and I was pretty pleased with myself, so I decided to move on to do a little bit of cooking with this system.

I placed some pork chops into this pressure cooker, added some onions and carrots and then proceeded to cook them. In about 20 minutes, I had a full dinner with tender pork chops that were cooked just right and weren’t overcooked. And when it was done, I noticed that the handles on this cooker stayed nice and cool. Which is always a plus.

Canning and cooking wasn’t the only things that were a breeze with this cooker, however. Clean up was as well. It took very little effort to get this thing clean and ready for its next job. Sure, I had to remove the sealing ring to clean the inside of the rim but that wasn’t difficult at all.

This cooker comes with a 12-year warranty, so I’m sure that it’s as durable as it looks and feels. However, I do see some potential problem areas. For example, you have to really take care of the dial gauge. It’s rather delicate and it can probably be easily broken. I also imagine that the gasket may wear out on this device before the rest of it does and need to be replaced. Of course, I didn’t have any problems with either part of this device but I haven’t used it for a long time either.

Overall, I think the Presto 01781 23-Quart Pressure Canner and Cooker is a high quality cooker that should bring you many years of cooking and canning. I know that it has become a welcome addition to my kitchen and maybe a welcome one in yours as well.

9.6 Total Score
Bottom Line

A high quality cooker that should bring you many years of cooking and canning. It has become a welcome addition to my kitchen.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
10
Value
10
Safety
9
Features
9
PROS
  • Safe On Smooth Top Stoves
  • High Quality
  • Durable
  • Good Value
CONS
  • Gaskets May Need Periodic Replacement
  • Care Must Be Taken With Dial Gauge
User Rating: Be the first one!

Up for review today is the Presto 01370 8-Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker. This is a pressure cooker from a company that’s known for making products that consistently get high ratings in pressure cooker reviews, so I was pretty anxious to see if they had produced the next best pressure cooker or at least one that came pretty close to being the best.

When I unpacked it, I noticed that it was very durable looking and was made out of stainless-steel. I also noticed that it had a base that Presto calls a Tri-Clad base. This base allows the heat of my stove-top to be equally distributed for fast and even cooking. And when I tried it out, I found that it worked really well.

I also noticed that when I tested it for the first time, that it easily maintained its pressure. That’s thanks to its pressure regulator. I was able to throw in the fixings for a soup that I wanted to make, close it up and the device easily maintained its pressure throughout the whole cooking process. I really have to give it a thumbs up for that handy feature that means that I can stray from the pressure cooker once in awhile.

When cooking, I noticed that this thing really cooked the food quickly. That’s probably because it gets up to 15 PSI of pressure. Which is what I like to see in a cooker. However, while I like cooking at a higher pressure, this cooker didn’t have any other option. So let’s say that I had a recipe that I needed to cook at 10 PSI. I would have to adjust my time. I kind of wish that it had at least a low setting that I could switch to if I was going to cook something a little more delicate.

Another thing that needs to be mentioned is that I would not recommend using it for canning. Most of the canning I do I do so at 10 PSI and this device doesn’t provide that option. That’s not even mentioning the fact that this cooker is a bit small to do any heavy-duty canning. 8 quarts is a spacious size for cooking for the family, but not so much for canning.

What I did really like on the Presto 01370 8-Quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker was that it had a quick steam release. When I needed to remove the lid, the quick release allowed me to sap off the steam so I could open it quicker.

All things considered, I think this device is a really good pressure cooker. It’s durable, easy to use and has a few nice features. It not only cooked my food really quickly but also did an exceptional job. While it wasn’t really good for cooking more delicate foods or for heavy-duty canning, I do think that it’s a good value and worth taking a look at. I think that it will be put to good use in most kitchens and won’t break the bank while it’s doing it.

9.6 Total Score
Bottom Line

I think it's really good. Durable, easy to use and has a few nice features - a good value and worth taking a look at.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
9
Value
10
Safety
10
Features
9
PROS
  • Durable
  • Heats Uniformly
  • Maintains Proper Pressure Automatically
  • Quick Cool Option
  • Cooks Quickly
CONS
  • Not Recommended For Canning
  • Pressure Isn't Adjustable
User Rating: Be the first one!

What’s up for review today? Well, I have the T-fal P45007 Clipso Stainless Steel Dishwasher Safe PTFE PFOA and Cadmium Free 12-PSI Pressure Cooker Cookware, 6.3-Quart in silver. Yes, I know that’s a mouthful to read but it tells you a lot about this cooker. So with that in mind, let’s just get right into the review.

I knew I wanted to review this product because of all the praise it received in pressure cooker reviews but the moment that I saw it, I knew it wasn’t going to be the best pressure cooker. Now, don’t get me wrong, it proved itself to be a very good one but it’s just not the best.

One of the things that really holds it back is its pressure. It only reaches 12 PSI, when many of its competitors are able to reach a PSI of 15. The pressure it generates isn’t bad but its low enough that it adds a little extra time to recipes meant to be cooked at a higher temperature.

It also would have been nice if this pressure cooker was a little bit bigger. While 6.3-quarts isn’t too bad, I would have liked it if it was more like 8-quarts. While they do make almost the exact same model in an 8-quart version, it was significantly more expensive than this one.

However, it isn’t all downside with this cooker. Like I said, it’s still pretty good. It’s very easy to use, so easy in fact that you can practically use it with one hand. Not only seal it but also release the pressure and take off the lid. Which made it really easy to make beef stew in it, which is exactly what I did next.

I chopped up a couple pounds of chuck roast, rolled it in flour and browned it, then cut up some potatoes, carrots, onions and celery and tossed them in as well.  I then added some spices (rosemary, sage, bay leaves, etc.), beef stock and salt and pepper. I closed the lid, turned it on and in 35 minutes had a nice hot stew.

When I was done cooking with the T-fal P45007 6.3-quart Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker, I then removed the gasket and pressure relief valve and tossed it into my dishwasher to be cleaned. Not bad for a lower powered pressure cooker, if you ask me.

In fact, this would be a much higher rated cooker if it only had a higher pressure level. After all, it’s a nice stainless steel pressure cooker that’s dishwasher safe and is PTFE, PFOA and Cadmium free. It also works with a variety of different stovetops, it doesn’t matter if you have a smooth top, a gas stove or an induction stove. It can be used on all of them. And all of these things make it pretty nice. My only problem is really the pressure level.

Which brings me to my final conclusion. If you are looking for a pressure cooker and you don’t mind that it operates at more than 12 PSI, then go ahead and get this cooker. However, if you need something a little bit more powerful, then you may want to look someplace else.

9.4 Total Score
Bottom Line

If you are looking for a pressure cooker and you don't mind that it operates at more than 12 PSI, then go ahead and get this cooker.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
9
Value
9
Safety
10
Features
9
PROS
  • Easy To Use
  • Open & Close With One Hand
CONS
  • Only 12 PSI
User Rating: Be the first one!

Today I’m going to review the NuWave Stainless Steel Pressure Cooker, 6.5-Quart. This is a cooker that seems to consistently get praised in pressure cooker reviews but is one that took me awhile to get around to. Why is that, you ask? Well, probably because I knew it was a lower-priced cooker and I probably just thought that maybe it wouldn’t be able to compete with some of the best pressure cookers I’ve checked out lately. However, I’m glad that I was kind of wrong.

It was a lot better than I thought it was going to be from the very beginning. While you can obviously tell that it’s not the same quality as some of the more expensive cookers, it still is made out of stainless steel and has a few features.

One of the features this thing has is the ability to choose between a “low” pressure setting and a “high” pressure setting. The low pressure one comes in about 7.3 PSI and the high pressure clocks in at about 13 PSI. While I wish the high was a little bit higher (more specifically, 15 PSI), I did think it was adequate to do the cooking I needed. I also appreciated the fact that since this unit has a low I can also cook some more delicate dishes in it. That made me pretty happy.

Another thing that impressed me is that it was easy to use. Fill it up, lock it with the flip of a switch and put it on your NuWave PIC (which I don’t have at the moment, so I didn’t test it on) or on your conventional stove top.  Once your food is cooked, you can then release the steam and remove the top. Pretty easy, if you ask me.

However, that isn’t to say that the  NuWave Stainless Steel 6.5-Quart Pressure Cooker is without its flaws. For one thing, It’s smaller than I would have liked it to have been. It would have been better if it was in the 8-quart size range, although I guess that might not have been possible in its current price range.

I also had a few problems cleaning it. The stainless-steel wasn’t as stainless as I would have liked it to have been and I spent a bit of time cleaning it out. Not too big of a deal but definitely something that needs to be mentioned.

All things considered, I think this is a pretty good little pressure cooker. It was easy to use, cooked well and I could adjust the temperature easily. It also had an easy lock lid that I really liked and didn’t take much time to depressurize. While it wasn’t the easiest cooker in the world to clean, I do have to say that you’d probably be hard pressed to find another cooker that cooked as well as this one did for the price. I don’t think that’s possible, so I’d have to give this unit a thumbs up and a pass on the rest.

9.2 Total Score
Bottom Line

All things considered, I think this is a pretty good little pressure cooker. You'd probably be hard pressed to find another cooker that cooked as well as this one did for the price.

Operating Temperatures
10
Cooking Quality
10
Value
9
Safety
9
Features
8
PROS
  • Easy To Use
  • Dual Pressure
  • Inexpensive
CONS
  • Hard To Clean
  • Not Very Big
User Rating: Be the first one!